Cell Phone Case With Tutorial

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You guys probably remember that a couple of weeks ago we celebrated my birthday. As it happens I asked my Husband for a new cell phone as a present because I needed one and I just hate useless presents… Anyway I got one smart phone and I am still getting used to it. Unfortunately I am not very talented when it comes to gadgets but my Husband is and he usually helps me very patiently. So, thanks to him for that!
Funny thing though, when he gave me the box and I opened it, he said: “now you have to sew a nice case for it because I didn’t dare to buy one for you!” And those were my exact thoughts, too! 😀
Last weekend I searched for some inspiration and I found this iPhone case. It has everything what I desire: a button with a loop and a small pocket. But I didn’t like very much the fabric and I wanted to use some of my blue prints and perhaps to funk it up a little with a bright polka dot green fabric. It sounded crazy at first but then I found the matching fabrics in my stash and started right away!
So here are the steps:

Step nr 1: I prepared the pocket and the loops: one for the button and one for the buckle:

DSC_3897Step nr 2: I cut out the body of the phone case twice. (Since every phone varies in size, you’ll have to figure out the right size for your phone if you want to make a case like this.) Added interfacing on one. Cut the batting as well.
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Step nr 3: I folded up the bottom of the pocket and sewed onto one of the green fabrics right in the middle.

DSC_3901Step nr 4: I folded the pocket into the right position and pinned it down. I also pinned the loop for the button on and the loop with the buckle on.

Phone Case-001Step nr 5: Then I layered the other green fabric onto the whole thing (right sides facing each other!) and pinned all layers together. Pay attention when you do this, this is a little tricky!

DSC_3910Step nr 6: Sew around the edges with small seam allowance and leave a 3-4cm wide hole in your seam. This is where you’ll turn the whole thing inside out.

Phone Case-002I added an extra seam at the loops to secure them even more. Then I cut off the corners.

Step nr 7: Turn it over and with some spray fabric adhesive add the layer of batting. DSC_3916Step nr 8: Turn it inside out and very carefully poke the corners. Now press it and hand-stitch the hole.

DSC_3918It looks quiet good at this point and it’s almost done!
Step nr 9: Fold it in half and sew together the sides as close to the edge as possible. If you want you can even hand-stitch at this point. Maybe add some decorative stitching if you prefer.

Step nr 10: Add the button. I had some trouble of choosing the right button: these were my three options:

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After much consideration I choose the beige button although I was leaning towards the green button but then I didn’t like the fact that the color of the button and the fabric didn’t match perfectly. The withe one was just too big, so I landed on the beige button.

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I am pretty happy with my new cell phone and its case. I like how it turned out and I love the way I was able to use the traditional Hungarian blue print fabric again and it is not at all boring old “souveniery”. phone-case-003

I find the blue print quiet funky paired with the green polka dots. And it is also practical: there is room for the ear plugs in the pocket. What do you think?

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Where to find Hungarian Blue Print

A few weeks ago one of my dear readers asked me if it is possible to buy Hungarian blue print fabric online. I’m sorry that it take me so long to answer this question but I am also glad that I waited so long, because I found a newly added video on the web-shop’s page as I was searching today!
There is an online store in the UK where it is possible to buy the blue prints and the good new is that they ship world wide! Here it is:
http://www.kekfestocotton.co.uk/index.php

And check out the video that I found on their website:

The video is actually from 2012, from the Huston Quilt Festival where a Hungarian quilter lady explains very well why is quilting a new thing in Hungary. And those quilts, which are presented on the festival, are absolutely amazing and I will most definitely try to look up those ladies and learn from their work! Wow! I am truly amazed because their work is very similar to what I have in mind, only they are so much more advanced in their techniques. A long way to go for me but I am happy that I found my quilter soulmates!

DIY Wine Tote

Last week I promised you a post about the wine bottle tote bag that I created for our little craft fair. The idea of making something like this came from a costumer last year who said that he adores my products but he is an elderly man who has also bigger grandchildren, so he just couldn’t use any of them. True. My products were made almost entirely for babies and smaller kids and of course I can not please everybody.
But I knew that this year the costumers will be at least 60% the same as last year (meaning elderly people) so I had to come up with a few ideas for them, as well. Then I came across this great idea on pinterest and when I went to Hungary in the summer I already knew that I want to use my new blue print fabrics for this bottle tote.

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For the first tote I only used a blue print fabric and nothing else.

To the second one I added a white strip of fabric and a blue zigzag ribbon.
My favorite was the third one where I used a plane blue print fabric (without any prints) and a funky yellow cotton fabric. I just loved the contrast of the colors! Finally I added the flower using applique technique (by hand). This one is the closest to my heart. And you know what? You won’t believe it: the same costumer from last year came back and bought it! I was happier to sell that one single item then all the others combined!

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But of course I made a couple more. One with beautiful leaves and one a bit more “christmasy”.

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I hope you find them nice and maybe get inspired and make one for yourself or someone for Christmas. It is really not a difficult project, it can be done under an hour. Just don’t forget to buy a good bottle of wine, too!

Once again: Hungarian Blue Print

You might remember a post that I wrote about a year ago, it was about the Hungarian blue print fabric and a couple of sewing projects made of blue print. I love this fabric. I love it because it is absolutely high quality and great to work with. I love the look of it. I love its colors: the white and blue but in many variations. I love it because it always reminds me of Hungary and my cultural background and heritage. I love it because I remember that my great-grandmother used to wear clothes made out of this fabric. Very traditional looking clothes. Actually I still have one of her outfits which is at least sixty years old if not more and for some reason I try to preserve it as long as I can. And I inherited old blue print fabric from her, as well and I used it to make a lovely skirt out of and I still wear it occasionally.
But I think sometimes this fabric is underrated. If you’ve ever been to Hungary, you might have seen this blue print in souvenirs shops. They would probably offer you some horrible looking apron, maybe a table cloth, a pillow or a girl’s skirt. I mean those are adorable but come on people, use your fantasy! We can do even better!

This is why I often wonder why don’t people use it for other, much more up-to-date projects? I have a long-term project in mind: I would like to make a huge quilt from blue print for our bed but I didn’t have the time to start yet. Hopefully I can report back on that in couple of months. Until then here are a few sewing ideas that I made for our up-coming craft fair in Aachen.
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My first project was this notebook cover. I sewed a couple of small pieces of different blue print together, then attached the white stripes, then I continued to make the cover as described in a previous post of mine. I love how it turned out.

Then I made lots of fabric angels for the craft fair just like last year. After all, it’s going to be a Christmas fair and last year people loved it.

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Here are a few with red fabric:

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A couple made with floral prints:

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A few more including my favorite with the yellow fabric:

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Aren’t they just cute?

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I saved the best for last: wine tote bags. I will post the tutorial and more in an other post but for now just enjoy how great they look in the blue print fabric!

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Using the yellow fabric and a plain blue print I created a bright, fun and modern wine tote. Even though I added a traditional flower mostly used in embroidery, it still looks very fresh and hip to me. Don’t you agree?

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Hungarian Blue Print for Christmas

I know it’s only September and you might ask why am I writing about Christmas? I didn’t go crazy, just let me explain. I was invited to a crafters’ market at the beginning of this year’s advent (which btw. will take place in Aachen) and this invitation got me thinking: last year I participated in a similar but much bigger Advent market where I realized that I should had prepared more “christmasy stuff”. As you probably know that by now, my favorite thing to sew is baby blanket but it is such a big item and at these markets the smaller items sell better. So I decided to figure out a few new items to sew and if it is possible, use the traditional Hungarian blue print fabrics.
In my first attempt I tried to make a Christmas ornament following this video. The ball turned out very well and I think it looks awesome, but it took me a lot of time and material to make it. So I will probably not make more of these for the market, just not worth it. But as a present or just for our family I’ll make a couple more for sure because it is a fun and easy technique and the end-result is really beautiful.

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About a week ago I found an other great idea. The tutorial itself is not very well detailed but with a little bit of creativity and logic you can make the angel ornaments without a problem. First I wanted to use only blue print fabric for this project, as well but then I had so much fun with those cute angels, that I made a lot more of them. I hope they will sell on the market.

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How do you like the other colors?

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I found the tutorial video to my last project just a couple of days ago but I couldn’t wait to try it out. These ornaments are really easy to make, don’t take much time and they look very good. Would you try to make them? This tutorial video is really well detailed and easy to follow, I can only recommend it.

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Hungarian blue print

I was recently thinking about my Hungarian heritage. I studied cultural anthropology and folklore, now I make blankets and other crafty things. How did this happen? And how could I continue crafting but also represent my culture at the same time? I feel like I have some kind of a mission since I don’t live in Hungary: with my actions and also with my products I represent a little bit Hungary. At least I feel this way. So I figured one thing out so far: I sew and I would like to use a traditional hand-printed fabric called blue print. It’s really a beautiful fabric, although not easy to use because it’s died in indigo and with washing one must be very careful. But I find it very good for patch-working with all the different kinds of pattern.

Some companies make “fake blue prints”. They are actually printed cotton fabrics, that look like blue print but they are very easy to work with. I had a little piece of this kind at home, some old scrap-fabric from a skirt that I made ages ago. And I created an other baby blanket/playing mat using this fabric.

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Take a closer look at the blue fabric, I think it’s very lovely:

IMGP7619I was also experimenting with free motion quilting but unfortunately there is no free motion quilt foot to my Janome sewing machine, so I did this very simple floral quilt with the normal sewing foot. And voila! It looks nice, don’t you think? And it shows of course on the other side as well:

IMGP7635One more picture of the final product:

IMGP7621Well, what do you think?

After I finished this blanket, we traveled back to Hungary and I was able to buy some real blue print fabric but let me tell you, it’s not easy to find! Anyway, next time I want to use blue print fabric, I will use the real ones:IMGP7649